Guitar Slim – Sufferin’ Mind

$15.99

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SKU: 022211700722 Categories: , , Tag:

Description

Release Date:  1991

Label:  Specialty Records

 

Track List

1. The Things That I Used To Do
2. Well I Done Got Over It
3. Story Of My Life
4. Letter To My Girlfriend (Aka Prison Blues)
5. Trouble Don’t Last
6. Later For You Baby
7. Bad Luck Blues
8. Twenty-Five Lies
9. Sufferin’ Mind
10. Stand By Me
11. Guitar Slim
12. Our Only Child
13. Reap What You Sow (Aka Bad Woman Blues)
14. I Want To Love-A You (Take 1)
15. Sufferin’ Mind (Take 1)
16. I Want To Love-A You (Take 11)
17. Think It Over
18. Quicksand
19. You’re Gonna Miss Me
20. I Got Sumpin’ For You
21. Something To Remember You By
22. You Give Me Nothing But The Blues
23. Going Down Slow
24. Certainly All (Take 2)
25. Something To Remember You By (Take 1)
26. Certainly All (Take 1)

 

Personnel

Alto Saxophone – Gus Fontenette
Baritone Saxophone – Clarence Ford (tracks: 21 to 26)
Bass – Lloyd Lambert
Drums – Oscar Moore
Vocals, Guitar – Eddie “Guitar Slim” Jones (tracks: 1 to 20)
Piano – John Gerard (tracks: 5 to 8), Lawrence Eddie Cotton (tracks: 8 to 26)
Piano – Ray Charles (tracks: 1 to 4)
Saxophone – Luther Hill, Jr. (tracks: 17 to 20)
Tenor Saxophone – Charles Burbank (2) (tracks: 1 to 4), Joseph Henry Tillman (tracks: 1 to 26), Oett “Sax” Mallard (tracks: 5 to 8)
Trumpet – Frank S. Mitchell (tracks: 1 to 4), Roosevelt Paul Brown (tracks: 8 to 20)

 

Review

His guitar fraught with manic high-end distortion and his vocals fried over church-fired intensity, Eddie “Guitar Slim” Jones influenced a boatload of disciples while enjoying the rewards that came with his 1954 R&B chart-topper, “The Things That I Used to Do.” This 26-song survey of Slim’s seminal 1953-1955 Specialty catalog rates with the best New Orleans blues ever cut — besides the often imitated but never duplicated smash, his “Story of My Life,” “Sufferin’ Mind,” and “Something to Remember You By” are overwhelming in their ringing back-alley fury. Slim could rock, too: “Well, I Done Got Over It,” “Quicksand,” “Certainly All,” and the raucous “Guitar Slim” drive with blistering power. Saxophonist Joe Tillman was a worthy foil for the flamboyant guitarist in the solo department.         Bill Dahl

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